Wellness and Spa

  • Winter Wellness and Northern Lights

    4 Nights, Winter

    From $1095 per person

    A 5 day tour in winter wonderland Iceland where, in addition to visiting the most famous places of the country, we will also hunt for the magnificent Northern Lights and enjoy wellness and spa in a 4* hotel. This is a real adventure of a tour including such highlights as the famous Geysir hot spring area, beautiful waterfalls and much more. The tour is designed to maximize your chances of witnessing the amazing Northern Lights as well as enjoying the warmth of Icelandic hot thermal water in the midst of the winter. The Blue Lagoon has become a world famous wellness and spa attraction. The Riverside Spa in Hotel Selfoss is designed to reflect the Icelandic nature with the theme of ice and fire emphasizing Iceland´s extreme nature.

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  • Natural Wellness Tour

    3 Nights, All Year

    From $1,075 per person

    On this 3 night break you stay in the capital, Reykjavik, and take 2 day-tours into the country to enjoy the amazing natural wellness centers at the Fontana Spa in Laugarvatn and at the Blue Lagoon. On your trip you will also visit three of Iceland´s most famous places - the Gullfoss waterfalls, the Geysir hot spring area and Thingvellir National Park.

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Our customers love us and so will you

Steve - Jul 21, 2015

Overall we were very pleased with the trip

We had a very nice trip to the West and South Iceland. The flights were good. All of the hotels were very good, especially Ranga. The Icelandair hotel was okay but far below the others. One important …


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Why Iceland?

Accessible via a short, five-hour flight from the east coast of the United States, Iceland is a lot closer than you might imagine

Glaciers

Despite its rather misleading name, only 11% of Iceland is covered by ice. That said, it is home to Europe's largest glacier, Vatnajökull, as well as 268 others.

Volcanoes

Volcanic eruptions in Iceland happen, on average, every five years. Although international media coverage surrounding the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption might lead one to believe otherwise, volcanic eruptions in Iceland tend to not have much impact on daily life.